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Showing posts from 2009

Computer Science students to present evaluation of oZone

Computer class evaluates oZONE for final project Kelsey Witten, Contributing Writer Friday, December 11, 2009 Computer science students will speak directly to the oZONE project team on behalf of nearly 1,000 opinionated students Monday during the class’ final exam period. Twenty-one students in Amy McGovern’s human and computer interaction class have been surveying and analyzing student and faculty opinions on OU’s oZONE Web site, which is the new hub of enrollment. The students will present their findings in front of McGovern and the oZONE team as their final project. “We were covering how you evaluate different user interfaces,” McGovern said of her class. “One of the major ways you do that is to get your user population in to do a survey. We were talking as a class about what we could evaluate and what would be interesting to them. Since oZONE just came out, it’s a very meaningful experience to [students] because everybody had to use it to enroll.” The class worked together to

Avila named Outstanding Senior in CoE

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JESUS I. AVILA of Del City displays the engraved platter he received as the Outstanding Senior in the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma during a Nov. 13 ceremony on the OU Norman campus. With him are (from left) OU President David L. Boren, OU Board of Regents Chairman Max Weitzenhoffer and College of Engineering Dean Thomas Landers. Jesus is a senior electrical engineering major. He will graduate in May 2010.

Stubsten named Overall Outstanding Senior Man at OU

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DAVID A. STUBSTEN of Fairvew displays the engraved trophy he received as the overall Outstanding Senior Man at the University of Oklahoma during a Nov. 13 ceremony on the OU Norman campus. With Stubsten, who is in the OU College of Engineering, are (from left) OU President David L. Boren (left), OU Board of Regents Chairman Max Weitzenhoffer and Mary Martha Stewart, president of the OU Parents’ Association. In addition, David has received numerous awards including: Homecoming Royalty Court Candidate Pe-et, Top Ten Senior Honor Society Regents’ Award for Outstanding Juniors (Top 12 Juniors) President’s Award for Outstanding Sophomores (Top 12 Sophomores) President’s Award for Outstanding Freshmen (Top 12 Freshmen) University College PACE Award Recipient (Top 1% of Freshmen Class) Robert C. Byrd Scholar Regents Scholar David A. Burr Scholar Jane E. Lawton Internship Award Recipient for President’s Leadership Class College of Engineering Distinguished Freshman Scholarship Floyd H. Grant

WaTER Center announces first prize recipient

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By Julianna Parker The Norman Transcript Published Nov. 1, 2009 An international symposium brought experts from business, engineering and public health together to talk about providing clean water to developing regions Friday at the University of Oklahoma. At the symposium, the WaTER Center announced the recipient of the International WaTER Prize: Dr. Stephen P. Luby. This is the first prize given by the Water Technologies for Emerging Regions Center at OU. The research center at OU is dedicated to helping solve drinking water challenges in impoverished areas. The prize was modeled after OU and World Literature Today's Neustadt International Prize for Literature, said David Sabatini, professor for the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and director of the WaTER Center. The panelists at the symposium Friday made up the jury for the prize. Each nominated someone for the prize and then they discussed it this week until they came up with a recipient. The prize

OU Racing produces its best season in team history

Wednesday, July 08, 2009 By Jay C. Upchurch OKGazette.com In Norman, the University of Oklahoma has forged a football tradition steeped in history, filled with more than a century’s worth of colorful characters, unforgettable moments and unparalleled success. Across campus at the OU College of Engineering, the fan base pales in comparison. Saturday crowds are practically nonexistent and the roster of talent contains nary a single household name. Still, the Sooner racing team has managed to build a fairly respectable name for itself in the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) over the last few years. In fact, the 19-member crew — all mechanical engineering majors — recently finished off the most successful racing season in the program’s 15-year history. OU closed the 2009 season with consecutive top-5 finishes, including a fifth-place finish at the Formula-SAE West competition in Fontana, Calif. That field included 80 teams representing 10 countries and 24 states. And yes, Oklahom

Engineering appoints new director to the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

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DATE: July 6, 2009 Farrokh Mistree, most recently a professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, has been named the L.A. Comp Chair and Director in the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering’s School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. He follows Professor and Lesch Centennial Chair Subramanyam Gollahalli who is stepping down as Director after having led the School for eight highly progressive years. Gollahalli is a leading authority in combustion science and technology, and is looking forward to devoting more time and creative activity to teaching, research and service. Mistree comes to OU with more than 30 years of experience in academia, beginning as a lecturer at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He also served as associate professor and professor at the University of Houston and as professor of the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. He worked with Professor Ward O. Winer

Cerato to receive Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

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Jana Smith, Director of Strategic Communications for R&D July 9, 2009 Norman, Okla.--Amy Cerato, assistant professor in the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science within the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma, is among 100 beginning researchers nationwide named by President Obama as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers starting their independent careers. “These extraordinarily gifted young scientists and engineers represent the best in our country,” President Obama said. “With their talent, creativity, and dedication, I am confident that they will lead their fields in new breakthroughs and discoveries and help us use science and technology to lift up our nation and our world.” Cerato is studying how to design and build robust foundations for critical infrastructures, particularly in marginal soils. She says the U.S

The College of Engineering embarks on her Centennial

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By Tom Landers Engineering education at OU has beginnings well chronicled by Dr. David W. Levy in The University of Oklahoma, A History, Volume I, 1890 – 1907. He notes that “In the Catalogue for 1901-1902 the new heading “Engineering Course” summarized the situation . . .” of engineering oriented courses available in mathematics, surveying, chemistry, and the like. The OU College of Engineering was formed in 1909 and recorded its first graduates in the spring of 1910. As we begin our 100th anniversary, we do so recognizing the dedication of those who have come before us, setting a precedence of excellence and contributing not only to who we are now but also to who we will become during the next hundred years. We look forward to celebrating this milestone in our history this academic year. Plans are still developing for events, which will culminate in the Centennial Symposium scheduled for April 21 and 22, 2010. The symposium will include stimulating panel discussions and stellar ke

We Remember (Aug 2008 to April 2009)

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We Remember  is a special section of Encounter in which we honor the lives of the men and women in the OU engineering family who are no longer with us. If we have omitted anyone, it was unintentional. Please contact us so we can pay appropriate tribute to our alumni.  John Richards Leonard , born April 12, 1918, passed away peacefully in Houston on August 27, 2008. John was born in Parkersburg, WV, the oldest of five children. When he was five years old, the family moved to Texas, where their father was employed in the oil patch in the area around Abilene. He graduated from Merkel High School in 1936 and enrolled in the University of Oklahoma at Norman, majoring in mechanical engineering. To pay for his education, he worked full-time for the Magnolia Petroleum Company (now Exxon-Mobil) in Oklahoma City, and went to college part-time in Norman. His education was interrupted by World War II, and he entered the Army Air Corps as a Second Lieutenant in 1942. Honorably discharged in 1945 wi

Welcome from Lisa Morris, Chair of the DABD

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I am always excited about reading a new Encounter but am especially excited about this edition. Typically, we tend to think about diversity solely as it relates to race. We may even extend those thoughts to include gender. As the current chair of the Dean's Advisory Board on Diversity, I am pleased that the articles in this special Diversity Encounter take a broader perspective of diversity as it relates to our College. Through these articles, we can view our College of Engineering through the lens of time as we look back on part of our history, as we become witnesses to what we're accomplishing today, and as we imagine the great successes that are to come. The stories illustrate the variety of academic goals and pursuits of our students in addition to how their differing paths brought them to a common place - the University of Oklahoma's College of Engineering. From the bird's eye view of this edition, there is a consistent, underlying thread from all the contributors.

Wayne Steen Memorial scholarship recipients

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  At the Minority Engineering Program's banquet in April,  Kelan Berry  was awarded the prestigious Wayne Steen Memorial MEP Scholarship for the 2009-10 year. Kelan said he considers this "the greatest honor," for he understands the significance of the memorial fund established by the man whose name his scholarship bears. Kelan, a senior industrial engineering major from Oklahoma City, was introduced to students from OU's industrial engineering program during a high school physics class. He was impressed with what he learned, so he visited campus. There, he met Ben Lopez, interim diversity and MEP director, making an instant connection with what would become his home away from home. Kelan was selected as an Oklahoma Alliance for Minority Participation in Science, Engineering and Math scholar his sophomore year. He participated in a Research Experience for Undergraduates program, during which he worked as a lab assistant and gained experience in making presentations on

Kelly Tran, Computer Science Graduate Spotlight

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Norman, Okla. is a world away from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where Kelly Tran was born. Yet, Kelly has discovered the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering as the perfect place to study and develop her passion in computer science. Kelly’s love of programming began in the second grade when she was introduced to Pascal. By the time she was in sixth grade, Kelly was able to analyze and better understand the programming process. When asked, “Why computer science?” Kelly responds without hesitation, “I like to see the computer respond to something I told it to do.” Kelly came to Oklahoma as a high school exchange student when she was 18. She attended Carl Albert State College for two years before entering the computer science program at OU. Upon arrival, she wasted no time in applying herself, not only to her undergraduate degree, but also in the university community at-large. According to Kelly, it was her adviser and mentor, Deborah Trytten, who made her transition to OU a smooth

The College of Engineering embarks on her Centennial Year

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   ngineering education at OU has beginnings well chronicled by Dr. David W. Levy in The University of Oklahoma, A History, Volume I, 1890 – 1907. He notes that “In the Catalogue for 1901-1902 the new heading “Engineering Course” summarized the situation . . .” of engineering oriented courses available in mathematics, surveying, chemistry, and the like.  The OU College of Engineering  was formed in 1909 and recorded its first graduates in the spring of 1910. As we begin our 100th anniversary, we do so recognizing the dedication of those who have come before us, setting a precedence of excellence and contributing not only to who we are now but also to who we will become during the next hundred years. We look forward to celebrating this milestone in our history this academic year. Plans are still developing for events, which will culminate in the Centennial Symposium scheduled for April 21 and 22, 2010. The symposium will include stimulating panel discussions and stellar keynote speakers

Diversity by Degrees

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  To say that Ginny Hardwick “keeps on her toes” is more than just an expression; it’s a daily requirement for this senior modern dance major. But keeping on her toes translates beyond the Reynolds Performing Arts Center Dance Studio as Ginny is also a computer engineering major. Like many young girls, Ginny has been a student of dance since she was four-years-old. Her passion for dance began at the Dallas Ballet Center where she studied ballet under Janie Christy for two years. Ginny continued classes at the Janie Christy School of Dance through her high school years, continuing to develop her skills and eventually teaching classes herself. But dance was not Ginny’s singular passion. She discovered a propensity for math early on which would lead her to pursue studies at the Science and Engineering Magnet High School in Dallas. A National Merit Scholar, Ginny’s challenge was to find the right university that offered both an excellent dance and engineering program. She auditioned for th

Group helps companies take off

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 by Heather Caliendo The Journal Record August 6, 2009 TULSA – Local universities have pooled their resources to keep Oklahoma’s aerospace industry flying forward.   Shivakumar Raman, director of SEAM (Shape Engineering for Advanced Manufacturing), with a coordinate measuring machine. (Photo by Maike Sabolich) Shape Engineering for Advanced Manufacturing (SEAM) strives to provide services for aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul services. The research and development center for SEAM is supported with faculty and resources from the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and the University of Tulsa. The idea for SEAM has existed for some time, said Shivakumar Raman, engineering professor at OU and director for SEAM. His vision for SEAM was to efficiently manage change within the aerospace industry and close technology gaps that might exist for Oklahoma-based companies. “We are selling a service, not a product,” he said. “We’re working to empower everyone involved in Oklah

Welcome from Elizabeth Cook, Diversity and MEP Director

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Dear Engineering Alumni & Friends! It is with great excitement that I write this letter as a reflection of our Diversity & Multicultural Engineering Program (MEP) here at the University of Oklahoma. The history and legacy that Wayne Steen has left in his wake is a daily inspiration to the work that we do in the diversity program. I am so proud to be part of such an amazing College at the University of Oklahoma, and I want to thank you for delving into the “Diversity Issue” of this ‘Engineering Encounter’! The Multicultural Engineering Program is based on the hard work and commitment of both students and staff who were determined to turn engineering from a possibility to a reality to many students for whom engineering was simply a dream. The promise that Mr. Steen made to those students long-ago has not waned. We are continuing to work with diverse students and provide avenues of support including internship opportunities, scholarship opportunities, and academic support to rival

The Wayne Steen Legacy

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When Wayne Steen – director of the OU College of Engineering’s Multicultural Engineering Program from 1980 through 2003 – died at the young age of 63 in March 2007, the effects were felt well beyond his immediate family. His untimely passing also impacted his extended family – namely, the students who had the privilege of getting to know this native Oklahoman and American Cherokee Indian who had invested so much of himself in them. Born and raised in Grove, a small town in northeastern Oklahoma, he graduated from the University of Kansas with degrees in aerospace engineering and counseling. Wayne’s industry experience with McDonnell Douglas in St. Louis, Mo., and educational experience with Haskell Indian Junior College in Lawrence and Johnson County Community College in Overland Park would provide the perfect context from which he would be able to relate to undergraduate and graduate engineering majors at the University of Oklahoma. And relate to them he did. Steen’s legacy was shaped

The 90,000-Mile Journey

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In December 2008, Jonathan Pipkin earned his bachelor of science degree in environmental engineering from the University of Oklahoma School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science, celebrating the fruits of his labor in last May’s convocation ceremony. But this wasn’t Jonathan’s first time around the academic block. His first OU degree, conferred in 1988, was a bachelor of science which he has put to good use working for Halliburton in his hometown of Duncan for 11 of the past 18 years. So why does a full-time employee and father of three decide to spend eight years traveling 90,000 miles and spending 1,000 hours in his car? Well, it’s not just so he can listen to NPR. Jonathan had climbed as high up the Halliburton ladder as his first degree could take him. He had served as a field chemist and scientist performing laboratory work, pre-job testing and quality assurance in field camps in Fort Smith, Wilburton and Duncan, as well as in customer service and direct sales. However, J

OU racing produces its best season in team history

Wednesday, July 08, 2009 By Jay C. Upchurch OKGazette.com In Norman, the University of Oklahoma has forged a football tradition steeped in history, filled with more than a century’s worth of colorful characters, unforgettable moments and unparalleled success. Across campus at the OU College of Engineering, the fan base pales in comparison. Saturday crowds are practically nonexistent and the roster of talent contains nary a single household name. Still, the Sooner racing team has managed to build a fairly respectable name for itself in the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) over the last few years. In fact, the 19-member crew — all mechanical engineering majors — recently finished off the most successful racing season in the program’s 15-year history. OU closed the 2009 season with consecutive top-5 finishes, including a fifth-place finish at the Formula-SAE West competition in Fontana, Calif. That field included 80 teams representing 10 countries and 24 states. And yes, Oklahoma bea

Cerato to receive Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Jana Smith, Director of Strategic Communications for R&D July 9, 2009 Norman, Okla.--Amy Cerato, assistant professor in the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science within the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma, is among 100 beginning researchers nationwide named by President Obama as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers starting their independent careers. “These extraordinarily gifted young scientists and engineers represent the best in our country,” President Obama said. “With their talent, creativity, and dedication, I am confident that they will lead their fields in new breakthroughs and discoveries and help us use science and technology to lift up our nation and our world.” Cerato is studying how to design and build robust foundations for critical infrastructures, particularly in marginal soils. She says the U.S. s

Program engineers path for girls

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 EDUCATION CAMP OFFERS STUDENTS EXPERIENCE, INSIGHT ON CAREER FIELD BY PAULA BURKES Published: April 5, 2009 NEWSOK.COM   Stephanie Andrade, 17, of Westmoore High School, left, and Cheyenne Arthurs, 16, of Locust Grove High School try a diversity test with liquids March 27 on the OU campus. Photo by JACONNA AGUIRRE, THE OKLAHOMAN Stephanie Andrade was 6 when her parents emigrated from Ecuador. English was foreign to her. But the numbers were the same. Andrade thinks that’s why she’s excelled in math and now aspires to a career in aerospace engineering. Locust Grove High School students pick up literature about the University of Oklahoma’s petroleum engineering school March 27 at a College of Engineering job fair in the Oklahoma Memorial Union on the OU campus. The junior from Westmoore High School joined 50 other students statewide for the Society of Women Engineers High School Girls’ Day on March 27 at the University of Oklahoma, and she hopes to return to campus for the OU College of

Shell gives back to aid several university programs

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 Funding to OU comes through many means Shell gives back to aid several university programs By Julianna Parker Published in the Norman Transcript on December 24, 2008   (From left to right: Michael Linse – Senior Petroleum Engineering major, Emmitt Moser – Petroleum Engineering major, Jennifer Johnson, Junior Chemical Engineering major, Jalon Debbs – Project Controls Engineer and representative for Shell Oil in Houston, Sohini Sur – PhD student from Geology & Geophysics, Matt Zechmeister, PhD student from Geology & Geophysics ) It's a symbiotic relationship. At college, students are prepared to enter a profession. Students are focused on getting jobs when they graduate, but the cards aren't all stacked against them. Employers also want well-trained entry-level workers. Some employers choose to reach out to their future employees while they're still in school. One such company is Shell Corporation. Shell donates a sizable chunk of cash to the University of Oklahoma&#