Friday, June 14, 2013

Caroline Cochran DeWitte, Recipient of Regents' Alumni Award


Caroline Cochran DeWitte received a Regents’ Alumni Award during a May 10 ceremony on the University of Oklahoma’s Norman campus.

DeWitte is the visionary who founded the OU Club of Boston. As president, serving from 2009 to 2012, she began by securing regular Sooner watch party locations for area alumni, which proved popular from the beginning and has grown to the largest in the Northeast, attracting attendees from bordering states.

Throughout her tenure as president of the club, DeWitte also organized networking events and socials to foster friendships and networking among alumni. She created the club’s website and social media connections, including  Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. The club currently has more than 250 Facebook members and 100 Twitter followers. She now serves as club treasurer and fundraising chair, managing club funds and continuing to guide other club officers on the board.

During her time as a student at OU, DeWitte cofounded Engineers Without Borders (now Sooners Without Borders), served as a member of the UOSA executive cabinet as communications director, and was the systems leader for the Sooner Racing Team, where she won an international design award for the braking system she developed. DeWitte helped establish OU’s Center for the Creation of Economic Wealth while serving as program manager intern with the Office of Technology Development, under current interim College of Business Dean Danield Pullin. She graduated in 2007 with a Bachelor of Arts in economics and a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering.

Without her vision, perseverance, creativity and love for her alma mater, the OU Club of Boston would very likely not exist today. DeWitte’s efforts have paved the way for greater collaboration with the university and connections among alumni.

Nominated by the OU Club of Boston.

The Regents’ Alumni Awards are presented each year to honor alumni and friends for exceptional dedication and service to the University of Oklahoma. The OU Board of Regents and the OU Alumni Association present the awards.
Nominations are accepted from alumni, friends and OU faculty and staff. The names of each year’s recipients are engraved on a permanent plaque that hangs in Oklahoma Memorial Union as a testament to the important role that OU’s alumni play in the life of the university.

John Kenney, Recipient of Regents' Alumni Award


John Kenney received a Regents’ Alumni Award during a May 10 ceremony on the University of Oklahoma’s Norman campus.

Kenney has been actively involved with OU since graduating with Industrial Engineering and Law degrees in 1971 and 1975. He has served nine years on College of Engineering Board of Visitors, including his time as chair during the OU Engineering Centennial Celebration.

Kenney’s leadership throughout the College of Engineering has encouraged a community of generous donors. Along with is wife, Jane, the Kenneys have hosted many events in their home for the college and the Industrial Engineering school. Through their generous donations and support, today’s engineering students enjoy new facilities, renovated classrooms and metting space as well as undergraduate and graduate scholarship support.

Kenney has been instrumental in the OU K20 Center for Educational and Community Renewal, serving as chair for the Board of Advisors and helping to develop a community that links professionals in K-12, university and industry settings with projects aimed at fostering improvements in learning at all levels. During his leadership of that board, the annual Oklahoma teacher SKIE award for innovative use of technology in STEM education was initiated and the K-20 Scholars program was established. He also serves on the Honors College Board of Visitors.

He supports his beliefs in 21st century learning through his daily interactions in service to OU. Nominated by Dean Tom Landers, College of Engineering in partnership with the College of Education and the College of Law.

The Regents’ Alumni Awards are presented each year to honor alumni and friends for exceptional dedication and service to the University of Oklahoma. The OU Board of Regents and the OU Alumni Association present the awards.
Nominations are accepted from alumni, friends and OU faculty and staff. The names of each year’s recipients are engraved on a permanent plaque that hangs in Oklahoma Memorial Union as a testament to the important role that OU’s alumni play in the life of the university.

Priscilla Nelson Inducted into Distinguished Graduates Society


Priscilla P. Nelson was one of three inducted into the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society during the May 11 Convocation on the Norman campus.

Nelson is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Nelson received a bachelor of science degree in geological sciences from the University of Rochester in 1970, a master of science degree in geology from Indiana University in 1976, a master of science degree in structural engineering from OU in 1979 and a doctoral degree in geotechnical engineering from Cornell University in 1983. Nelson served as provost at the New Jersey Institute of Technology from 2005-2008 and has a national and international reputation in geological and rock engineering and the particular application of underground construction. She has more than 20 years of teaching experience, has mentored many students and has more than 120 technical and scientific publications to her credit.

Her previous experience includes 11 years at the National Science Foundation concluding her service as senior adviser to the director of NSF. During her time at NSF, she acted in many capacities, including program director for the geotechnical engineering program, director for Professional Opportunities for Women in Research and Education program, director of the Civil and Mechanical Systems division, and as program manager for the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation. She received the NEES Community Visionary Award in 2005.

Nelson was appointed to the faculty in civil engineering at The University of Texas at Austin from 1983 through 1996, rising from assistant through associate and full professor ranks. She was elected to The Moles, an association of the heavy construction industry (1995) and inducted into Tau Beta Pi as an eminent engineer (2007). At the NSF she received the Director’s Award for Integrative Collaboration four times, and was presented the Director’s Award for Meritorious Service in 1997. In 1999, she was appointed to the senior executive service. Also in 1999, she received the Director’s Award for Superior Accomplishment from the NSF. In 2008, she received the Kenneth Andrew Roe Award from the American Association of Engineering Societies, and was honored in the Executive Women of New Jersey Salute to the Policy Makers.  She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Rock Mechanics Association, distinguished member of ASCE, and honorary diplomate of the Academy of Geo-Professionals. Nelson currently serves on the National Academy Committee on Underground Engineering for Sustainable Urban Development, and as an adviser to the National Academy’s Center for Engineering, Ethics and Society.

In 1990, the College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society was established to honor our most accomplished alumni. Selection is based upon prominent and distinguished professional or technical achievement, notable public service, outstanding contributions, and other significant contributions to the engineering profession.
Membership in the society affords the public acknowledgment and recognition befitting these graduates. Each year, society awardees are honored by the administration, faculty and students of the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma through participation in the induction ceremonies at spring convocation.

Richard Milburn Inducted into Distinguised Graduates Society


Richard A. Milburn was one of three inducted into the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society during the May 11 Convocation on the Norman campus.

Milburn graduated with honors with a bachelor of science degree in aeronautic and space engineering in 1964 and a master of science degree in aerospace engineering in 1965, both from OU. He is a member of the engineering fraternities Sigma Tau, Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Gamma Tau.

After receiving his pilot’s wings as a distinguished graduate in October 1955, he served as an interceptor pilot with the Aerospace Defense Command and served overseas with the 26th Air Division of ADC. He was the project engineer responsible for the YF-12 Interceptor (later SR-71) program, chief of the Weapons System Division of the Joint Chiefs of Staffs and served in London as assistant air attache and chief of the foreign technology office.

In 1977, Milburn was selected chief of the Mutual Defense Assistance Office at the American Embassy in Tokyo, Japan. He retired as a colonel in 1980 after an assignment as chief of the Air Force Headquarters Management Policy Division. Milburn joined the Grumman Corp. in 1980 and later was promoted to vice president for defense programs. After multiple promotions and the merger of Northrop and Grumman, Milburn was appointed vice president, Northrop Grumman International in Washington, D.C. After subsequent appointments to managing director and vice president for the Advanced Stand-Off Radar program in the United Kingdom as well as corporate director of Northrop Grumman Corp., Milburn retired from Northrop Grumman in 2011. Milburn currently is president of RAM International and continues to work with General Dynamics and Barbaricum.

Milburn is a member of the Order of the Daedalians, the Royal Aeronautical Society and the New York Academy of Science and is an Associate Fellow in the American Institute of Astronautics and Aeronautics.  He is chairman emeritus of the U.S. delegation to the NATO Industrial Advisory Group, and in that capacity is a member of the Conference of National Armament Directors of NATO. Milburn also served six years as chairman of the American League for Export and Security Assistance and is a member of the Board of the National Defense Industrial Association and the Board of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Aviation Education and Training as well as the Board of Advisors for the OU School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering.

In 1990, the College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society was established to honor our most accomplished alumni. Selection is based upon prominent and distinguished professional or technical achievement, notable public service, outstanding contributions, and other significant contributions to the engineering profession.
Membership in the society affords the public acknowledgment and recognition befitting these graduates. Each year, society awardees are honored by the administration, faculty and students of the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma through participation in the induction ceremonies at spring convocation.

Paul McEuen Inducted into Distinguished Graduates Society



Paul L. McEuen was one of three inducted into the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society during the May 11 Convocation on the Norman campus. A Goldwin Smith Professor of Physics at Cornell University, McEuen directs the Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics and the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science. His research focuses on nanoscale electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene, nanotubes and related materials. He received a bachelor of science degree in engineering physics from OU in 1985 and a doctoral degree in applied physics from Yale University in 1991. He joined the faculty at UC-Berkeley in 1992 before going to Cornell in 2001.

McEuen is interested in both the science of these nanostructures and their applications in physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and engineering. He is particularly fascinated by nanoscale forms of carbon, especially graphene sheets and single-walled carbon nanotubes. His group has probed many fundamental aspects of electron transport in carbon nanotubes, including single electron charging, non-Fermi liquid behavior and topologically induced spin-orbit coupling. They also have probed the physical and mechanical properties of both nanotubes and graphene. For example, they have shown that a one-atom thick graphene membrane is an impenetrable barrier and functions as a high-performance drumhead resonator. McEuen is excited about building tools to interface to the nanoscale world and the construction of functional nanomachines.

McEuen has served on a number of advisory panels and committees, including the DOE BESAC Grand Challenges in Energy Subcommittee (2006), the NRC Decadal Survey Team — Condensed Matter and Materials Physics (2006), and the APS Division of Condensed Matter Physics Executive Committee (2003-2006). He also has organized conferences and workshops, including the Kavli Futures Symposium on Cyborg Cells (2007) and the Gordon Conference on Condensed Matter Physics (2005).

Awards and honors include a Packard Foundation Fellowship, a National Young Investigator Fellowship and the Agilent Europhysics Prize. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He also is a novelist, and his debut scientific thriller SPIRAL was published in the United States by Random House in March 2011 and 15 markets worldwide. He was awarded best debut novel for 2011 by the International Thriller Writers Association.

In 1990, the College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society was established to honor our most accomplished alumni. Selection is based upon prominent and distinguished professional or technical achievement, notable public service, outstanding contributions, and other significant contributions to the engineering profession.
Membership in the society affords the public acknowledgment and recognition befitting these graduates. Each year, society awardees are honored by the administration, faculty and students of the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma through participation in the induction ceremonies at spring convocation.